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Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway

The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway is a low-cost marine super-highway and the world’s longest deep-draft navigation system. It extends 2,300 miles and borders eight states (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin) and two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Quebec). More than 100 commercial ports line the navigation channel, serving as gateways for waterborne commerce moving within the region or between North American and overseas destinations. Source: Marine Delivers. For more information about the economic benefits of the Great Lakes-Seaway navigation system, visit: www.marinedelivers.com

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Cleveland Seamen’s Service

A volunteer organization providing services and hospitality to crews from around the world while their vessels are docked at the Port of Cleveland.

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Edgewater Marina

Hurricane Sandy devastated Cleveland’s Edgewater Marina in October and demolished dozens of boats. The Port’s two clean-up vessels – Flotsam and Jetsam – played a key role in removing the remains of boats broken up during the storm.

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Today

The Cleveland Lakefront Nature Preserve is an 88-acre man-made peninsula on the Lake Erie shoreline in the heart of Cleveland.

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Birds

THE FOLLOWING BIRDS HAVE BEEN SIGHTED OVER THE YEARS AT THE CLEVELAND LAKEFRONT NATURE PRESERVE. PHOTOS WERE TAKEN BY CHUCK SLUSARCZYK.

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Butterflies

THE FOLLOWING BUTTERFLIES HAVE BEEN SIGHTED AT THE CLEVELAND LAKEFRONT NATURE PRESERVE. PHOTOS AND LIST WERE COMPILED BY LEPIDOPTERIST SUSAN GALLAGHER AS PART OF A LONG-TERM STUDY.

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Before the Corps built Dike 14, the shoreline at the site was part of the land William Gordon willed to the City of Cleveland in 1896 for use as a public park (now Gordon Park). In 1962, two old freighters were sunk offshore to create a breakwall to protect the park’s beach. During this time it was not uncommon for solid waste to be dumped along the lakeshore. The waste eventually formed an approximately 10-acre area between the sunken freighters and the shoreline. The Corps designed the contours of Dike 14 to encompass the entire area. Over the years, layer upon layer of sediment – essentially sand, soil and clay – was placed within the walls of Dike 14 and formed what is now the Nature Preserve. The Corps continues to dredge roughly 210,000 cubic yards of sediment annually – an amount that could fill most of a sports stadium. But that material is placed in other CDFs that are north of Burke Lakefront Airport.

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